We spoke about fitness and its importance, winning ability. Now let’s try to look through some info and samples on fighting techniques.

Muaythai is known as an ‘eight weapons’ which means both legs and hands, elbows and knees can be used when fighting. All kinds of kicks and punches can be applied including grappling and clinch.

Not that often you can witness any of extraordinary skills though, like a round house kick following by a spinning back kick for example or right-left step in with that left elbow coming in done by legendary Jamhod or those skills from french boxing savate while fighting under thai rules. The best example will be for sure my old friend Farid Khider.

Any skills in any sport are probably based on foot work, body (weight) balance and how coordinated you are. Means having all these in complex you will be able to defend yourself and attack from any position.

Personally I believe this foot work, coordination and flexibility is the base to start. Then learning some basic punches and kicks and applying them when fighting, getting experience in the same time, will be the step number two. All to be followed by proper fitness work and work on pads to get the right action technique and power.

Then all these will be used like an engine in a fight, I mean your instincts and reaction will work automatically. The top class will probably be when you listen to your trainer giving advises from the corner, think yourself in a fight before the action and be able to make analytics of all this… and BANG ! All this in combination within less than a second. Such a skill…

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Parviz Iskenderov

Parviz Iskenderov is a muaythai fighter from Perth, Australia. He is a former national champion of Belarus, and also a finalist of IFMA European Cup. He is an editor and journalist at FIGHTMAG. He covers national and world news. Iskenderov is also the WKN (World Kickboxing Network) international coordinator for Australia.