When you go to the gym every day to do some basic training or targeted preparation for an up-coming professional bout.

For some muaythai or kickboxing is just a way to escape from daily routine. For some it is a routine. Well basically it’s just a lifestyle for the fighters when it becomes their profession and they live from it, like Wayne Parr for example. Routine probably will sound a bit rude especially when love to this sport gives motivation and quite a few opportunities in life too.

It will probably be hard for me to describe how it feels when you do training just for fitness as I’ve never done anything like this in my life. I mean if I train – I train for the fight, not for body toning and basic fitness like that girl said. It’s nice to see a gym full of people who are keen to learn some muay thai techniques and upgrade the skills they already have. Plus cardio work which is popular nowadays – cardio-boxing or thai-bo the way they call it, coordination and simply to stay healthy.

Talking about the training for the fights, well a lot can be said. I just remember around eight years ago when after school rushing home to get that bag with gear and run to the gym to make sure you are not being late, otherwise it’s disrespectful towards the trainer and others. Discipline and order that what they teach in Belarus. Training there it is always a class session always. I mean there is no difference how experienced or titled you are – you always do exactly the same training as others – what the coach says you do. In some other countries the difference can be noticed quite easy, when the fighters do their own thing and the actual coaching process is a bit strange too.

There must be a system in training starting from the proper warm up, when all parts of the body are prepared as most of injuries received at training come from not being warm enough that’s all. Each session should be different otherwise it will get boring, though the basics should be repeated each time and confirmed as a ground knowledge same as homework at school. Means you have your proper base and each time you learn something new in combination with fitness.

Will be silly not to say that probably one of the most important things will be sparing. To find a good sparing partner sometimes quite hard regarding to difference of weight division or level of experience. To get that good conditioning, range, the right feeling of being in the ring and power as well – all this finally come from sparing where the last step will be when you can last, say all full 10 rounds against 10 different hard opponents in a high tempo, full on working.

And… a bit of physical exercises at the end of session, push-ups and everything and the most annoying but so lovely part will probably be those push kicks from knee 20 times each leg at the very end of the session when you can hardly stand… Such an exercise, though it saves in a fight from having soft legs and let’s you move and keep your opponent on the distance with that push kick if needed.

Training is beautiful, never be lazy.

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Parviz Iskenderov
Parviz Iskenderov is a muaythai fighter from Perth, Australia. He is a former national champion of Belarus, and also a finalist of IFMA European Cup. He is an editor and journalist at FIGHTMAG. He covers national and world news. Iskenderov is also the WKN (World Kickboxing Network) international coordinator for Australia.