Thinking during the fight is very important so you are able to switch from one technique and tactic to another.

Before each bout the fighter together with the trainer choose a special tactic for this or that opponent. How to fight and domination.

Normally it starts when the fight is taken and confirmed. Watching the latest videos of the opponent, looking at his style of fighting, finding out his weak places and mistakes he does. It’s some sort of scan when you know exactly who you are going to compete with and what needs to be improved and worked on at your end.

Well when the fight starts you know exactly what to do, according to the plan. What if the plan doesn’t work? When you try to do this or that things you thought would work well but it simply doesn’t. Plan – B, where this plan is normally something completely different from what you have expected to do, that’s why it is so important to be multi-skillful and be able to change and be different in the ring according to situation.

During the brake between the rounds the trainer normally tells what needs to be done and changed. Or if the fighter is experienced enough he can simply manage the situation himself during the fight.

This video below is all about what I’ve just said. It was in 2006 when that guy just wouldn’t fall down, probably having a liver made of steel… During the brake I was advised a simple thing and in the second round it worked well.

Sometimes it’s not about tactics or skills or anything physical like this. It works on the mental level as well.

For example when Shakuta fought Kongnapa in America around 10 years ago. Shakuta was young and fought a Lumpinee champion, strong Thai, who was based in US and that tournament was for his glory too.

First two rounds Shakuta was pushed back and couldn’t do much. Though he was able to brake that level of Kongnapa’s confidence and perform complete domination over him. Confidence level I am talking not only about how many fights you had and how strong you are and all…

It is also about when you are a local fighter and all crowd cheers and supports you you feel like a local hero or something and ready to win. If you are a guest, quite often you feel opposite. Those who fought out of hometown on big ring know well what I am saying and how it feels.

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Parviz Iskenderov
Parviz Iskenderov is a muaythai fighter from Perth, Australia. He is a former national champion of Belarus, and also a finalist of IFMA European Cup. He is an editor and journalist at FIGHTMAG. He covers national and world news. Iskenderov is also the WKN (World Kickboxing Network) international coordinator for Australia.