Muay Thai for Ladies Has a Long List of Benefits

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Australia’s first string Yolanda Schmidt shares her understanding of muay thai for ladies as today’s most popular workout.

Hands down, the women’s bouts are substantial for any fight night promotion these days. Female and male fighters receive an equivalent coverage in media. Kickboxing, muaythai and of course MMA circles, are full of female talents. Only boxing, the oldest fighting sport, is still mostly concentrated on one on one man talk. What is more, a modern woman utilizes such sports for perfecting herself. In very deed, the sports that not long ago were considered as brutal, are on the A-list current training program. Brazilian jiu-jitsu, cardio box, kickboxing and of course muay thai for ladies, feature in the roster of practically any gym.

A Menai high school teacher in Illawong, NSW Yoland Schmidt is a bronze medalist at world championship. She believes that “for women specifically muaythai is a convenient way of meeting new people and obtaining a full body workout. All at the same time,” she says.

“Women may choose this sport as a resource for self-defense. It is also an avenue to release energy or frustration from the daily life. There is always a desire of learning a new skill. Muay Thai builds mental toughness, teaches you to love yourself.”

 

“Females who are less athletic may find muaythai appealing due to the fact that it is a full body workout.

“As a women myself I know that time and convenience is a priority for women.”

“The next barbie on the market will be a muaythai badass.”

“This sport is versatile and does not discriminate. In today’s society muaythai is not a sport that portrays females as Tom boys, strong is the new skinny.

In November 2015 Victoria’s Secret model Gracie Carvalho broke the news sharing with TMZ that muaythai is her toughest workout. Last Friday People.com topped up the buzz with Carol Trentini who’s training includes a mix of “boxing, jumping jacks, skipping and Muay Thai – the kicks especially help tone my butt,” she said.

“What is girlish? This too in the eye of the beholder,” says Schmidt.

“Long hair and painted nails, the way we talk and the way we carry ourselves?”

“When discussing this points we need to look at what they were before. What were there traits before they became a fighter? Perhaps it never changed.”

“Each to their own, but I can say that you can still be ‘girlish’ and be a kickass fighter.”

Yolanda Schmidt is teaching female muaythai classes every Saturday at 9.30am at PTJ gym in Gladesville, NSW, Australia.

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Parviz Iskenderov
Parviz Iskenderov is a muaythai fighter from Perth, Australia. He is a former national champion of Belarus, and also a finalist of IFMA European Cup. He is an editor and journalist at FIGHTMAG. He covers national and world news. Iskenderov is also the WKN (World Kickboxing Network) international coordinator for Australia.

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