Bob Sapp talks career ahead of Greg Tony fight (Exclusive)

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“The Beast” Bob Sapp speaks before Fight Night Saint Tropez

Bob Sapp is someone who needs no introduction to combat sports fans. It’s a name that evokes a lot of great memories and a lot of controversy. Although at one time he was the hottest name in fighting during his incredible run in Japan when he was involved in MMA, kickboxing and pro wrestling all at the same time, his post K-1 fights seem to have tarnished whatever legacy he would have had.

Being a professional wrestler myself, I wasn’t completely opposed to Sapp’s actions inside the ring. But I also respect real combat sports enough to know that once you sign your name on the dotted line, you should be expected to do what the paying customer expects you to do and that’s deliver a meaningful fight. But with Bob Sapp I don’t really think there are too many people out there who expect him to actually deliver a meaningful fight, especially at this point in his career. It’s a topic which I discussed at length in my June 2013 blog entitled “Bob Sapp’s Embarrassment Tour Continues”.

At any rate, in this interview on The FightBox Podcast, my goal was to try to get to the bottom of what is motivating Sapp to do what he’s been doing in the ring. The answers I got from him seem to confirm the suspicions I’ve had all along.

Obviously Sapp is no stranger to mixing it up and delivering some of the most hard-hitting, action-packed fights in the history of combat sports. His fights with the likes of Ernesto Hoost, Antonio Nogueira, Yoshihiro Takayama and others are legendary. So why is it that from about 2005 or 2006 onwards almost every fight seems to follow the same pattern of him taking one or two shots, falling down, turtling up and waiting for the referee to stop the fight?

“If you want to see the Ernesto Hoost fight, then you pay Ernesto Hoost money. That sounds good to me. I’m all about that.” Bob explains it in further detail in the video above.

So what can we expect when it comes to his upcoming bout at Fight Night Saint Tropez on Friday August 4th in France? Which Bob Sapp are we going to see, the 2002 Sapp or the post 2005 Sapp? I think his closing quote “look for it to be a fast fight” says it all.

At age 43, Sapp hasn’t had a legitimate fight since the early 2000’s. Does he really expect promoters to pay him “K-1 Money” at this point in his career? Highly unlikely, especially given his already deplorable reputation as a fighter. My prediction is a first round TKO (three knockdowns) by Gregory Tony.

Expect Fireworks

However, don’t let the whole Bob Sapp drama deter you from watching the rest of the fights at Fight Night Saint Tropez. They really seem to have gone out of their way to bring some of the best kickboxers in the world to France for this card.

The main event is a contest for the World Kickboxing Network super middleweight title between the reigning champion Yohan Lidon (92-36-1, 55 KO) and the challenger out of Germany Florian Kroger (39-8-1, 18 KO). I would expect fireworks. A complete seven-fight card can be found below.

Super middleweight Yohan Lidon vs. Florian Kroger – WKN title
Super heavyweight Gregory Tony vs. Bob Sapp
Heavyweight Stephane Susperregui vs. Danyo Ilunga
Super heavyweight Tomas Mozny vs. Daniel Sam
Heavyweight Filip Verliden vs. Mikhail Chalykh
Featherweight Mallaury Kalachnikoff vs. Marina Spasic
Welterweight Evgeny Kuravskoi vs. Umar Semata

Gregory Tony face off 'The Beast' Bob Sapp – Fight Night Saint Tropez ???

A post shared by World Kickboxing Network (@worldkickboxingnetwork) on

Next week on The FightBox Podcast, my guest will be the current Bellator women’s kickboxing champion Denise “Miss Dynamite” Kielholtz. We talk about her next fight, her marriage to Hesdy Gerges and much more.

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Don Roid
Don Roid is a TV commentator, journalist and podcaster for the FightBox TV channel. He is the host of The FightBox Podcast, an interview show where he talks to top fighters from around the world in all fighting disciplines. He did professional wrestling for 15 years, competing in nine different countries. Born in Erie, Pennsylvania, USA, he later moved to Poland, where he now resides and where he started the country's first ever pro wrestling promotion in 2009, Do or Die Wrestling.

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