Muay Thai experience in beginner fights

Muay Thai fighting experience

By definition experience is the knowledge or mastery of something by way of either being involved in it or exposed to it. Muay Thai fighting certainly requires the first one. One can say it is impossible to learn and, first of all, understand fighting by way of observation.

The featured video is the fourth fight of Misagh Norouzi when he went up against the eight-fight opponent late August 2015. So he challenged someone with a double experience, moreover took the win.

Please note, I am definitely not encouraging anyone to fight an opponent who has much more advantage than you. You have to fight the “right fights”. The elbow master Nathan “Carnage” Corbett spoke about this in a video blog a few years back.

What I am saying is that every fight we go in, must teach us lesson, otherwise it is a waste of time, furthermore health. Learning a lesson means gaining experience, and of course it’s preferred to be a positive one.

In Misagh’s example, there was nobody for him to fight at that time, so we took the bout.

This is where training (preparation) plays a significant part topped by experience of coaches. A trainer has to make sure that an athlete is ready to fight this or that particular opponent.

One of the frequently asked questions is “how long before the first fight”? Misagh wanted to make his debut in one month after entering the gym. We however spent three months training for his first Muay Thai fight.

Experience as disadvantage

I find interesting that some experience can also play a role of disadvantage. I’ve seen a few fighters going in the ring undefeated with six bouts behind their belt. This means they have only experienced a victory, which is a good thing, right?

However this also means that they have never experienced a defeat, which can and should be used by their “underdog” opponent as advantage. The idea is to defeat your opponent mentally, by making them experience something completely new during the actual fight. The latter is achieved quite easily – via beating them up (we are talking combat sports here).

In summary, I would say, that in some cases as early you experience something – is better. This makes you ready for the next time.

(There is obviously a number of things in life that are better not to be familiar with whatsoever.)

If you have just started learning the Art of Eight Limbs, you might find useful one of my previous posts, Muay Thai training tips for beginners and first-time fighters. We have also filmed several videos dedicated to training techniques which can be found on YouTube.

In addition, everyone has their own first Muay Thai fight experience. It all depends on what you original goal was, whether you have achieved what you aimed for, what made you enter the ring in first place, and so on.

As an example, you can read what the Australian model Lilian Dikmans learned from her first Muay Thai fight.